The CATIE Exchange

The CATIE Exchange - January 25, 2017 

Highlights in this Issue

  • CATIE declares, “Undetectable equals Untransmittable” (U=U)
  • Updated HIV in Canada: A primer for service providers
  • Canada–U.S. study looks at age when cancer appears in HIV
  • CBRC’s gbMSM Health Network webinar: Responding to the overdose crisis in BC: implications for gay men's health providers
  • New CATIE Blog post on The Positive Plus One study

New Resources

HIV in Canada: A primer for service providers

CATIE, Updated in 2017

HIV in Canada is an introduction to HIV for people working on the front line. It provides an overview of the HIV landscape in Canada, including the epidemiology of HIV; trends in diseases related to HIV; and trends and issues in prevention, treatment, care and support for people with or at risk for HIV.

The purpose of the resource is to provide some starting points for dialogue among national, regional and local stakeholders in HIV to support strategic HIV planning and decision-making in Canada. It is a living document and is regularly reviewed and updated to reflect current knowledge of HIV in Canada.

Access it online

Frequently Asked Questions about Hepatitis C (in English and Punjabi)

BC Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), 2016

This brochure, written in English and Punjabi, offers basic information on hepatitis C in Canada and is intended for immigrants and newcomers.

Download the PDF
 

Frequently Asked Questions about Hepatitis C (in English and Hindi)

BCCDC, 2016

This booklet, written in English and Hindi, offers basic information on hepatitis C in Canada and is intended for immigrants and newcomers.

Download the PDF

External condoms and lube for safer sex [Inserts, 100 per package]

CATIE, 2016

This small resource (final folded size is 3.25” x 2.5”) provides basic information on condom use, including a diagram of how to put on an external condom and the benefits of condom use. It also provides basic messaging on STI testing, new HIV prevention methods and where to get more information. Finally, it leaves a space for organizations to add contact information. The resource can be inserted into safer sex packages or stand alone as a discrete resource.

Download the PDF

Internal Condoms and Lube for Safer Sex [Inserts, 100 per package]

CATIE, 2016

This small resource (final folded size is 3.25” x 2.5”) provides basic information on condom use, including a diagram of how to insert (and remove) an internal condom and the benefits of condom use. It also provides basic messaging on STI testing, new HIV prevention methods and where to get more information. Finally, it leaves a space for organizations to add contact information. The resource can be inserted into safer sex packages or stand alone as a discrete resource.

Download the PDF

TreatmentUpdate 218

CATIE, 2016

TreatmentUpdate is CATIE's flagship digest on cutting-edge developments in HIV and hepatitis C research and treatment.

In this issue: Research with women and HIV

Download the PDF

News

Canada–U.S. study looks at age when cancer appears in HIV

Exploring viral suppression rates among some Indigenous people who started ART

HepCinfo Update 8.1: Hep C treatment information needs; liver, kidney disease and bone problem risk in co-infected; Hep C treatment for people with kidney problems

CATIE updates

CATIE declares: “Undetectable equals Untransmittable” (U=U)

On January 13, CATIE endorsed the Consensus Statement of the Prevention Access Campaign that people living with HIV on HIV treatment who have had an undetectable viral load for more than six months and continue to have an undetectable viral load, do not sexually transmit HIV, with or without the use of condoms. CATIE signed on to the Statement in celebration of the revolutionary advances in HIV science that now enhance people’s participation in safe, sex-positive relationships.

Laurie Edmiston spoke about CATIE’s endorsement of U=U in her CATIE blog post and referred to this news as “the most significant development in the HIV world since the advent of effective combination therapy 20 years ago.”

CATIE subsequently published a second blog post outlining the reasons why we endorse U=U.

Two studies, HPTN 052 and the PARTNER study, published their final findings in 2016, reinforcing the effectiveness of a sustained undetectable viral load. The latter study followed 548 heterosexual and 340 gay male serodiscordant couples who had regular unprotected sex while the HIV-positive partner had an undetectable viral load. Despite over 58,000 anal and vaginal sex acts, no HIV transmissions occurred between the partners.

In order to maintain a healthy and safe sexual life, CATIE emphasizes the importance of medication adherence and regular healthcare appointments to check HIV viral load. Regular health visits will also keep other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in check. The CATIE statement on the use of antiretroviral treatment to maintain an undetectable viral load to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV contains more information about HIV viral loads and STIs in relation to this important prevention strategy.

CATIE Survey: How are we doing?

Are you a frontline service provider doing HIV or hepatitis C work? We would love to hear from you!

Please complete our 15-minute online survey and tell us how CATIE is doing. Your comments will help us evaluate our services and work to enhance them. All responses are anonymous.

Mark your calendars for the CATIE Forum 2017!

CATIE will hold its next CATIE Forum in Toronto on November 23-24, 2017. Details concerning the program will be forthcoming in the months ahead. We hope you and your organization can make the Forum part of your 2017 plans.

CBRC’s gbMSM Health Network webinar: Responding to the overdose crisis in BC: implications for gay men's health providers

January 31, 2017
1 p.m. – 2 p.m. ET

In this webinar we will review what is known regarding current drug use trends among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men in BC, and describe the current overdose crisis related to fentanyl consumption in BC. We will then describe the current provincial response to the overdose crisis including the naloxone distribution program, focusing on the information that is relevant for service providers working with gay men to know.

Dr. Mark Gilbert is the Medical Director of Clinical Prevention Services at the BC Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), and an Associate Clinical Professor in the School of Population and Public Health, UBC. Mark has expertise in public health programs and research related to gay men's health, HIV and STI testing, and online health services.

Dr. Jane Buxton is the harm reduction lead at BCCDC and Professor at UBC, School of Population and Public Health. Jane developed the Drug Overdose and Alert Partnership and introduced the take-home naloxone program in BC in 2012. Her research includes mixed methods and includes people with lived experience in developing priorities for harm reduction research, policy and program implementation and evaluation.

Register today!

Webinar: Strategies to address reimbursement restrictions for Hep C treatment:  Lessons from Australia

February 6, 2017
3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. EST

In Canada, direct-acting antiviral (DAA) hepatitis C treatments are costly, so provinces and territories limit access to patients based on fibrosis stage and other criteria such as HIV coinfection.  How can we move beyond this approach and achieve a model of access for all?

This webinar by CATIE, CanHepC, CTAC and The Kirby Institute, will explore how Canada could move beyond its current restrictive and inconsistent approach to DAA access. The webinar will showcase the Australian model, which allows all people access to hepatitis C treatment, including people who inject drugs and people in prison. This webinar will examine what social and environmental factors led to this model and what policy-makers, service providers and community activists in Canada can learn from the Australian experience.

Learn from experts such as Alison Marshall and Greg Dore of Australia’s The Kirby Institute; and Helen Tyrell of Hepatitis Australia. Engage in discussion with Adam Cook of CTAC and Action Hepatitis Canada, and Community Organizer Zoe Dodd.

Register today!

The CATIE Blog: New Post:  Three reasons why CATIE supports U=U for sexual transmission By Camille Arkell

The CATIE Blog is our way of bringing more people into the conversation about HIV and hepatitis C. Check out our recent posts:

Highlights from our Partners

CHABAC: African, Caribbean and Black Canadian HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

The third annual African, Caribbean and Black Canadian HIV/AIDS Awareness Day is on February 7, 2017 to help raise awareness of HIV and contribute to addressing HIV-related stigma in Canada’s African, Caribbean and Black communities. A national webinar will be held on February 2, 2017 from 1:00-2:00 pm ET. More details coming soon will be announced here.

Awareness Day posters with the message, Start a conversation. Know your health options. End the stigma, are available to download or order from the CATIE Ordering Centre. You can also download a version of the poster with a white box for inserting information about your event here: English and French.

You can also plan a local event. CHABAC proposes the following ideas for events:

  • Host a showing of the video “The Test” followed by a discussion
  • Link up with a local HIV testing site to encourage HIV testing on February 7
  • Hold a cultural or artistic event and start a conversation about HIV by distributing condoms and sharing HIV and Awareness Day information

Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA): Webinar: Improving health equity in Canada's African, Caribbean and Black communities (English only)

People from African, Caribbean and Black (ACB) communities face multiple forms of stigma and discrimination. HIV-related stigma is just one of these. The purpose of this webinar, held on February 7, 2017 from 1 − 2 pm ET, is to raise awareness and understanding of HIV-related stigma in Canada’s ACB populations and offer strategies that have proven to reduce it. Register here! Contact Rachel MacLean for more information

Canadian Association for HIV Research (CAHR): Registration deadline

Register by February 6, 2017 to take advantage of the Early Bird rates for CAHR. For details regarding registration categories and more information on registration, please visit the CAHR 2017 website.

Action Canada for Sexual Health & Rights: SRH Week 2017 is from February 12-18

This year, Sexual and Reproductive Health Awareness Week (SRH Week) will take place from February 12-18 with the theme: Ready for some pillow talk? On February 12, they will be launching a quick reference book for healthcare providers and a blog series spotlighting healthcare providers making a difference. For campaign graphics, social media tools, PDF copies of the poster and more, visit www.srhweek.ca.

CIHR Canadian HIV Trials Network (CTN): Visioning Health II

Visioning Health II builds on the work of Tracey Prentice’s PhD thesis Visioning Health I, which, among other findings, found that the process of participating in culturally-grounded, arts-informed interventions for HIV-positive Indigenous women, was itself health-enhancing. This second project seeks to use the process, activities, and Indigenous-knowledge orientation they used in Visioning Health I as a health promotion intervention aimed at optimizing the well-being of positive Indigenous women living in Canada. Charlotte Loppie, Reneé Masching, Doris Peltier, and Tracey Prentice lead the team implementing the research. To find out more, click here.

Realize: Survey on Using Evidence to Inform HIV and Aging Programs

This survey is designed for individuals and organizations interested in developing programs, services or policies with an impact on people aging with HIV in Canada. Realize will use the results of this assessment to determine what they can do to support the development of evidence-informed HIV and aging programs, services and policies in Canada. The survey should take no more than 15 minutes to complete and will be available until February 10, 2017.

HIV & AIDS Legal Clinic Ontario (HALCO): Ryan Peck wins the Legal Aid Ontario Sidney B. Linden Award

Ryan Peck, HALCO’s executive director, is this year’s winner of the Legal Aid Ontario Sidney B. Linden Award. This award recognizes individuals who have demonstrated an exceptional commitment to assisting low-income Ontarians in the pursuit of access to justice. Ryan has worked to further HALCO’s mandate of advancing the human rights of people living with HIV and of using laws and the legal system to reduce discrimination, stigma, poverty and injustice faced by people with HIV. For the full announcement, click here.

Bright ideas!

Wrap it Up!: A condom campaign BIGGAR than most!

January 2017

Saskatoon Sexual Health has teamed up with Territorial, OUTSaskatoon and the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute to bring Saskatonians a fun and educational condom campaign called Wrap It Up!

Funded by the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute and the Saskatchewan HIV Strategy, Wrap It Up! builds on an existing condom distribution program started by Saskatoon Sexual Health, but this time with a cheeky twist. It has added amusing messages to the condom packaging to appeal specifically to youth. The new messaging was added after consultations revealed that young people are more willing to use condoms if they are seen as being fun, sexy and exciting. The condoms riff off of local place names such as “REGINA, the city that rhymes with fun,” “SASKATOON, wanna spoon?,” “CLIMAX, please come again” and “Toronto is big but this is BIGGAR. Because the condoms are playful, people are eager to order them.

In October 2016, right after the campaign was launched, condom distribution increased by 20 per cent. Since then, eight new locations where people can pick up condoms have been added.

The campaign also aims to increase people’s knowledge of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and create awareness about testing. A campaign website lists all 35 condom pick-up locations, as well as testing sites. The website also provides information about birth control, fun facts about condoms and a demo video on how to use condoms effectively.

“We wanted to make sure we weren’t just doing a service that was providing something for free, but also providing programming that was connecting people to something that they would see as valuable,” explains Jill Arkles-Schwardt, the Executive Director at Saskatoon Sexual Health. “It was important to us to do something to address the high rates of STIs and HIV in the province of Saskatchewan.”

Wrap It Up! has garnered a huge response so far, with a lot of media attention and with people vying to collect all four designs; some even calling in with suggestions of other funny slogans to print.

For more information about this campaign, visit http://wrapitupsk.com/ or contact Jill Arkles-Schwardt at info@shcsaskatoon.ca.